Virtues, Virility, and Ministry — Calvinist Ruminant

"In the classical world, there were four recognized virtues: Wisdom, Courage, Temperance, and Justice." Because there's more to Manhood than the Manosphere.

Everything they’ve told us is suspect. (Autism, this time)

Thanks to Ido Kedar's calling attention to it, I'm excited to see news that the Accepted Position on "Facilitated Communication" is not only bunkus, but demonstrably bunkus. The Usual Suspects haven't chimed in, AFAIK, but the linked study asserts a pretty firm case for letter-board communication being (frequently, if not usually) real and legitimate communication… Continue reading Everything they’ve told us is suspect. (Autism, this time)

When the Bible’s Own Commands Are Unbiblical.

An answer to Ben Witherington's Why Arguments Against Women in Ministry Aren’t Biblical, on Patheos.com. Mr. Witherington's essay, dated from 2015, resurfaced recently in the wake of the "embarrassing" scandal of John MacArthur's remarks about Beth Moore. I'm no fan of MacArthur, nor of Moore, but the remarks MacArthur made, heard here in original context,… Continue reading When the Bible’s Own Commands Are Unbiblical.

Men of Worth are interested. — Adam Piggott

, the act itself of creating, that mankind most truly echoes the Imago Dei.

Still thinking about catechesis and spiritual growth — The Pocket Scroll

Information is not enough.

Received vs. Reconstructed

Beyond the Alpha-Beta-Gammas, Part 1: Dalrock and the Aristotelian Mean

In which the manosphere and GQ are both wrong.

On Sacrificing Children to Educational Abstractions

There are two heathen altars in American cities on which ordinary citizens sacrifice their children on a regular basis, and it's unclear which has done the most evil, overall.  I'll let others decide which is Molech and which, Chemosh, but the first, most obvious idolatry takes the form of Planned Parenthood's so-called "clinics" and other… Continue reading On Sacrificing Children to Educational Abstractions

The Insidious Brick-Works of American Education

Joseph Moore examines how we came to be Bricks in the Wall.