Horror Comes Home

Dusklight is a great follow-up to Chalk, LaPoint's schoolgirl-vs-abominations intro to the world and disruptive life of Raven Mistcreek, the fastest tomboy to draw a sidearm on the wall.

Review Overdue: Chalk, by N. R. LaPoint

When I reviewed Chalk on Amazon, I was short and to the point, without any spoilers. Or details, for that matter: This book will not cure insomnia. It will in no way help you sleep. If you are in need of full, restful nights' sleep, do not pick the book up after supper. If you… Continue reading Review Overdue: Chalk, by N. R. LaPoint

Superversive: by Tom Simon

A "Guest Post," or rather a reposting with permission, of Tom Simon's essay that started it all. The original essay is here, but the link may not cooperate with some browsers' notions of "Secure Sites". Stuff and Nonsense, say I!

Night-Time Is Always the Worst: Ch. 3

“I didn't like the way you treated Sam just now,” she said when he reached her table.
“Sam was begging for it.” She was wearing something much too short, but Kriever was too busy to be impressed. “Put on a coat and take me uptown, doll,” he said.

Read ’em while you’ve got ’em!

Read 'em while you can, lasses and lads. They won't be up forever.

The Planetary Books

Those who've followed this blog will remember that I got a couple of stories picked up by an outfit called Superversive Press in their "Planetary" anthology set. Unfortunately, Superversive Press folded before they could publish more than the first five of the set (and only one of my stories). The good news is, the anthologies… Continue reading The Planetary Books

Tracing the Arkenstone

Whence came the Heart of the Lonely Mountain, the Arkenstone of Thrain? What do we know about the Heart of the Mountain? It was found by the children of Durin beneath the Lonely Mountain, and it shown with its own inner light, as even the hobbits attest in the Red Book of Westmarch.

The Wolf’s Cry: Author’s Notes on an Unfinished Tale

One of the seminal reasons I opened this sporadic blog in the first place was for a venue to air my writing-- some of it going back to high school, twenty years ago-- that was mouldering on my hard drive without a chance to be read by readers. The story The Wolf's Cry was one… Continue reading The Wolf’s Cry: Author’s Notes on an Unfinished Tale

The Wolf’s Cry: Chapter Four

"My friends, guests, neighbors, jokebrunts, et cetera, et cetera, I have asked you to come because Things are Happening," said the satyr. 

The Wolf’s Cry: Chapter Three

"Now, here are my maps, all very incomplete, of course—a little hobby of mine.  Folks from all over come in here, mostly gnomes, of course, but a few dwarves not too proud to duck a bit sometimes.  The Father has blessed all his children, and I feel my blessing is to share in hospitality."

The Wolf’s Cry: Chapter Two

Were those footsteps?  He hid himself behind a massive oak—greater than any he had seen in Europe.  The trunk was more than five feet in diameter, and smelled musty—very musty.  He could almost smell the centuries of age in the bark. But there were the footsteps again!  This time he was sure of it.  He peered out around the trunk...

The Wolf’s Cry, Chapter One

"I'm wondering if there isn't a connection between this Viking’s appearance and our man's disappearance." "Yes, but I still don't know.  It's all...so...well, I don't know.  So unusual..."

The Basis of SubCreation

It only occurred to me this week, some few days after I opened the Stories shelf with The Bestiary and The Legend of Gnat Bunker what those two pieces have in common.  They are not merely "creative" but meta-creative. They're about how we create what we do, and in a deeper sense, why.